Class Author

Pamela Clark
No Attachment

Pamela Clark, CRNI, is a Nurse Supervisor for Accredo, a leader in specialty pharmacy care. She has more than 28 years of experience in infusion therapy and infusion education with both licensed nurses and patients. Her experience spans multiple infusion settings including: acute care, long-term care, home infusion, and ambulatory infusion care. She also has experience in oncology and oncology research.


Read More...

What People Are Saying...

Florida Board of Nursing Approved IV Education

An online continuing education course for nurses, medical health care professionals, and other interested individuals.

Pedagogy Inc.’s Florida Board of Nursing Approved I.V. Education has been designed to fulfill the Florida Board of Nursing’s education components required for the Licensed Practical Nurse to practice infusion therapy and is often referred to as I.V. “Certification”.

The Florida Board of Nursing has delineated very specific content to be included in the LPN infusion curriculum and specifics may be viewed in the Florida BON Rules, Chapter: 64B9-12.005 Competency and Knowledge Requirements Necessary to Qualify the LPN to Administer IV Therapy.

This comprehensive 30 hour online education program meets the Florida Board of Nursing IV Therapy requirements for LPN’s, as well as, provides an excellent refresher course for the Registered Nurse or as a primer for new RN’s.

This 30 hour online continuing education provides a low stress, convenient method of obtaining quality infusion education incorporating various educational techniques designed for the adult learner. The program is comprised of the 30 hour didactic portion completed on your time schedule.

Upon successful completion of the course exam, with a score of 80% or greater, the student may instantly print a “Certificate of Completion” for the didactic portion of the course. Within the course content, Pedagogy Inc. provides a complete set of skills competency checklists for completion by a Florida licensed Registered Nurse preceptor or employer.

Objectives

Objectives for Section 1: I.V. Therapy Basics 
Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to: 

  1. List the entities responsible for defining legalities related to infusion therapy and their roles 
  2. Discuss methods to decrease anxiety related to infusion therapy 
  3. List the veins used to deliver I.V. therapy 
  4. State the signs, symptoms, treatment, and prevention of nerve damage related to I.V. therapy 
  5. Describe the signs, symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention of hyper/hypovolemia 
  6. State the causes and treatments of electrolyte imbalances 
  7. Identify methods of fluid regulation 
  8. Demonstrate the correct calculation of an I.V. flow rate 
  9. Identify methods of infection control related to I.V. therapy 
  10. State the appropriate venous access device for the therapy ordered 
  11. List at least 5 types of venous access devices 
  12. Describe the peripheral-short I.V. catheter insertion procedure 
  13. Describe the steps involved in a catheter site dressing procedure 
  14. Identify complications of I.V. therapy; their causes, prevention and treatment 
  15. List the components of accurate and complete documentation of I.V. procedures and complications 
Objectives for Section 2: Hypodermoclysis: 
Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to: 
  1. Identify at least 3 factors that contribute to dehydration in the elderly. 
  2. Define hypodermoclysis. 
  3. Describe the advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of hypodermoclysis. 
  4. Describe the appropriate sites, solutions, volumes and rates for hypodermoclysis. 
  5. Describe the procedure for hypodermoclysis administration. 
  6. State at least 3 potential complications of hypodermoclysis. 
Objectives for Section 3: Parenteral Nutrition 
Upon completion of this course, the participant should be able to: 
  1. Identify at least three medical conditions that indicate the use of TPN 
  2. Identify at least three components of TPN 
  3. Demonstrate understanding of TPN administration by recognizing the steps involved in TPN preparation and infusion
  4. Recognize at least two potential complications of TPN 
  5. State at least four TPN monitoring measurements 
Objectives for Section 4: Transfusion 
Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to: 
  1. Explain the blood grouping systems and their importance in transfusion therapy. 
  2. List available blood components and indications for each. 
  3. Describe the activities required in preparation for a transfusion. 
  4. Identify equipment used to administer a transfusion and it’s proper usage. 
  5. Describe the nursing management of a blood component infusion. 
  6. Describe signs and symptoms of transfusion reactions, and appropriate interventions for each. 
  7. Explain appropriate patient education related to transfusion therapy. 
  8. Identify the required documentation for a blood transfusion.
Objectives for Section 5: Chemotherapy 
Upon completion of this curriculum, the nurse will be able to: 
  1. Define how chemotherapy is used in cancer management 
  2. List the major chemotherapy drug classifications and their general mechanisms of action 
  3. Identify the major side effects/toxicities of chemotherapeutic agents 
  4. Describe safe chemotherapy handling techniques 
  5. Describe appropriate chemotherapy administration 
  6. Recognize common psychological effects in patients receiving chemotherapy 
Objectives for Section 6: Gamma Globulin 
Upon completion of this course, the participant should be able to: 
  1. Names at least three conditions for which gamma globulin is indicated 
  2. Demonstrate understanding of gamma globulin administration by recognizing the steps involved in its preparation and infusion 
  3. Recognize at least two side effects of gamma globulin infusion 

Curriculum

Section 1: I.V. Therapy Basics 

This section of the Florida I.V. Therapy curriculum has been written to provide basic concepts and skills to the nurse who has had limited exposure to infusion therapy principals and practice or requires updated knowledge to comply with current standards. Many State Boards of Nursing require that the LPN have additional infusion therapy education after licensure and Florida is one of those states. The Florida Board of Nurses has defined the post-graduate infusion therapy education requirements of the licensed practical nurse who intends to participate in the provision of infusion therapy in the state of Florida.

This curriculum was developed to specifically meet those requirements. It is also an excellent refresher for the RN who has not had recent experience and/or is not familiar with the current infusion therapy standards of care. This curriculum provides the didactic portion of the required education. Competency requirements are obtained and maintained through the nurse’s employer, facility or institution. 


Section 1: I.V. Therapy Basics Outline 

Chapter 1: Legal Issues 

  • Regulatory Agencies and Governing Bodies 
  • Components of a Complete Physicians Order 
  • Legal Terms and Applications 
  • Protective Measures for Guarding against Malpractice 

Chapter 2: Psychological Needs of the I.V. Patient 
  • Age-specific Patient Needs 
  • Cultural Aspects 
  • Patients with Sensory Deficits 
  • Fear Factors 
  • Methods of Reducing Patient Anxiety 

Chapter 3: Anatomy and Physiology 
  • The Vascular System: Veins, Arteries and Bone Marrow 
  • The Three Layers of the Vessels and Their Function 
  • Differentiating Arteries from Veins 
  • Veins Used in Peripheral I.V. Therapy 
  • Veins Used for Central I.V. Therapy 
  • Nerves—Avoiding Damage 
  • Skin-- Anatomy and Physiology 

Chapter 4: Fluid and Electrolyte Balance 
  • Water 
  • Assessment for Hypovolemia/Dehydration 
  • Assessment for Hypervolemia/Fluid Overload 
  • Fluid Compartments 
  • Electrolyte Imbalances 

Chapter 5: pH, Osmolality and Incompatibilities of Solutions and Medications 
  • pH 
  • Tonicity 
  • Plasma Expanders 
  • Incompatibilities 
  • Flushing Protocols 

Chapter 6: Fluid Regulation 
  • Methods of Fluid Regulation 
  • Patient Considerations in Fluid Regulation 
  • External Factors 
  • Calculating I.V. Flow Rates 

Chapter 7: Infection Control and Safety 
  • Costs Related to Infections 
  • Hand Hygiene/PPE/Supplies 
  • Catheter Insertion 
  • Medication Administration 
  • Site Care 
  • Diagnosis and Treatment 

Chapter 8: Technology and Equipment 
  • Needleless Connector 
  • Securement Device 
  • Dressing 

Chapter 9: Site Selection and Device Placement 
  • Criteria for Site and Device Selection 
  • Types of Peripheral I.V. Access 
  • Considerations for Peripheral- Short I.V. Access Placement 
  • Peripheral-Long (Midline Catheter) 
  • Types of Central Venous I.V. Catheter 
  • Considerations for Central Lines 
  • Arterial Catheter 

Chapter 10: Care and Maintenance of the I.V. Catheter 
  • Dressing Change 
  • Needleless Connector Change 
  • Flushes 
  • Administration Set Change 
  • Implanted Venous Port Access 

Chapter 11: Complications 
  • Local Complications 
  • Systemic Complications 

Chapter 12: Step-by-Step Guide to I.V Management 
  • Pre-insertion Procedures 
  • I.V. Bag and Administration Set Preparation 
  • Peripheral-Short I.V. Catheter Insertion 
  • Preparations for Central Venous Catheterization 
  • I.V. Catheter Dressing Change 
  • I.V. Catheter Needleless Connector Change 
  • I.V. Catheter Flush 
  • Port Access 
  • Central Venous Access Blood Draw 
  • I.V. Catheter Removal 

Chapter 13: Assessment, Documentation, and Patient/Caregiver Education 
  • Catheter Insertion Documentation 
  • Catheter Removal Documentation 
  • Documentation of Complications 
  • Assessment, Monitoring and Documentation by Therapy 
  • Patient Education 

Section 2: Hypodermoclysis 

This section of the Florida I.V. Therapy curriculum has been designed to provide information regarding the use of hypodermoclysis, also known simply as clysis, to achieve rehydration in patients who might otherwise require hospitalization. Dehydration is a common occurrence, especially in the older population. Clysis is an optimal means of administering non-emergent parenteral fluids in a familiar, comfortable environment. This intervention is cost-effective, easy to administer, and safer than intravenous rehydration, but many nurses are unfamiliar with the therapy. This section will prepare the licensed nurse to provide this valuable intervention, thereby decreasing the risk of hospitalization with its associated risks and costs. 

Section 2: Hypodermoclysis Outline 

Chapter 14: Dehydration 
  • Scope of Problem 
  • Contributing Factors 
  • Signs and Symptoms 
  • Assessment 

Chapter 15: Hypodermoclysis 
  • Advantages 
  • Disadvantage 
  • Indications 
  • Contraindications 
  • Use in Terminally Ill Patients 

Chapter 16: Infusion Parameters 
  • Sites 
  • Solutions 
  • Volume and Rate 
  • Hyaluronidase 

Chapter 17: Administration 
  • Equipment 
  • Procedures 

Chapter 18: Complications 
  • Systemic Complications 
  • Local Complications 

Chapter 19: Communication and Documentation 

Section 3: Parenteral Nutrition 


This section of the Florida I.V. curriculum has been designed to provide current conceptual and operational knowledge to the licensed nurse interested in the provision of parenteral nutrition therapy. The understanding and use of TPN has evolved since its entry into mainstream healthcare several decades ago. For both the RN and LPN involved in providing nutritional support, this course contains current practices for best patient outcomes. 

State Boards of Nursing have varying positions on the role of the LPN in the administration of parenteral nutrition. The Florida Board of Nurses does not specifically prevent the LPN from administering parenteral nutrition, but does state that the LPN may not mix I.V. solutions, meaning that the licensed practical nurse may not insert any TPN additives to the infusion bag. Additionally, competency requirements are obtained and maintained through the nurse’s employer, facility or institution. 

Section 3: Parenteral Nutrition Outline 

Chapter 20: Indications for Parenteral Nutrition 
  • Altered Absorption Capacity 
  • GI Disorders Requiring Complete Bowel Rest 
  • Intractable Vomiting or Diarrhea 
  • Hypermetabolic States 
  • Anorexia Nervosa 

Chapter 21: Goals 
  • Maintenance of Normal Body Weight and Protein Status 
  • Restoration of Normal Body Weight and Protein Status 
  • Maintenance or Restoration of Normal Micronutritional Status 

Chapter 22: Normal Nutritional Requirements 
  • Protein 
  • Carbohydrate 
  • Lipid 
  • Vitamins 
  • Minerals 
  • Trace elements 

Chapter 23: Nutritional Assessment 
  • Anthropometrics 
  • Biochemical 
  • Clinical 
  • Dietary 

Chapter 24: Composition of Parenteral Nutrition 
  • Dextrose 
  • Amino Acids 
  • Lipids 
  • Water 
  • Electrolytes 
  • Vitamins 
  • Trace Elements 
  • Other Additives 

Chapter 25: Administration 
  • Central Venous Access Devices 
  • Electronic Infusion Devices 
  • TPN and Lipids 
  • Preparing the TPN for Infusion 
  • Initiating the Infusion 

Chapter 26: Complications 
  • Metabolic Complications 
  • Vascular Access Device-Related Complications 

Chapter 27: Monitoring and Documentation 
  • Psychological 
  • Vital Signs 
  • Blood Glucose 
  • Weight 
  • Intake and Output 
  • Laboratory Tests 
  • TPN Administration 
  • I.V. Catheter Care 

Section 4: Transfusion Therapy 

This section of the Florida I.V. therapy curriculum has been designed for nurses caring for the patient receiving transfusion therapy. There are various blood components infused for very specific purposes, and each component requires knowledge related to that specific product. This specialized type of therapy requires advanced nursing knowledge beyond that required for the provision of general infusion therapy. Therefore, education related specifically to the administration of blood products is crucial to the safe and effective use of these components. This course will provide information necessary for administering these life saving infusions. 

State Boards of Nursing have varying positions on the role of the LPN in the administration of infusion therapy, including the administration of blood products. The Florida Board of Nurses specifically states that initiation of blood and blood products is outside of the licensed practical nurse’s scope of practice. The LPN may monitor the transfusion after initiation and care for the patient receiving this therapy. Competency requirements are obtained and maintained through the nurse’s employer, facility or institution. 

Section 4: Transfusion Therapy Outline 

Chapter 28: Introduction to Transfusion Therapy 
  • Blood Components 
  • ABO Blood Group System 
  • Rh Blood Group System 
  • Other Blood Group Antigens 
  • HLA System 

Chapter 29: Whole Blood 
  • Description 
  • Indications 

Chapter 30: Packed Red Blood Cells 
  • Description 
  • Indications 
  • Donation and Testing 
  • Red Blood Cell Subsets 

Chapter 31: Platelets 
  • Description 
  • Indications 
  • Donation and Testing 
  • Platelet Subsets 

Chapter 32: Plasma 
  • Description 
  • Indications 
  • Donation and Testing 

Chapter 33: Granulocytes 
  • Description 
  • Indications 
  • Donation and Testing 

Chapter 34: Clotting Factors 
  • Cryoprecipitate 
  • Factor Concentrates 

Chapter 35: Pre-transfusion Activities 
  • Physician Order 
  • Patient Consent 
  • Type and Crossmatch 
  • Vascular Access 
  • Baseline Vital Signs 

Chapter 36: Transfusion Administration 
  • Component Transport and Storage 
  • Equipment 
  • Pre-medication 
  • Identification 
  • Administration 
  • Monitoring 
  • Patient Education 
  • Documentation 

Chapter 37: Complications 
  • Immune Complications 
    • Hemolytic Reactions 
    • Non-Hemolytic Reactions 
  • Non-immune Complications 
    • Infectious Complications 
  • Transfusion Associated Fluid Overload (TACO) 
    • Complications of Massive Transfusion 

Section 5: Chemotherapy 

This section of the Florida I.V. therapy curriculum has been designed for nurses administering and/or caring for the patient receiving chemotherapy. Both nurses involved in infusing chemotherapeutic agents and those caring for patients receiving these medications need a working knowledge of the diagnoses for which they are given, side effects of the drugs, appropriate nursing interventions, and the psychological implications of having these diseases and receiving treatment for them. These drugs are double-edged swords. They can both cure cancer and cause cancer. They are associated with more side effects and more serious side effects than most other medications nurses administer. Therefore, education related specifically to chemotherapy is crucial to the safe and effective use of these drugs. 

State Boards of Nursing have varying positions on the role of the LPN in the administration of infusion therapy, including the administration of chemotherapeutic agents. The Florida Board of Nurses states that the initiation or administration of cancer chemotherapy is outside of the licensed practical nurse’s scope of practice, but that it is appropriate for the LPN to care for patients receiving this therapy. The registered nurse providing chemotherapy should be well versed in its administration and all related procedures. Competency requirements are obtained and maintained through the nurse’s employer, facility or institution. This course provides 3 contact hours of continuing education. 

Section 5: Chemotherapy Outline 

Chapter 38: Introduction to Chemotherapy 
  • Definition 
  • Goals of Chemotherapy 
  • Cell Cycle 
  • Chemotherapy Approaches 

Chapter 39: Chemotherapy Drug Classifications 
  • Cell-cycle Specificity 
  • Mechanism of Action 
  • Alkylating Agents 
  • Antimetabolites 
  • Antitumor Antibiotics 
  • Mitotic Inhibitors 
  • Topoisomerase Inhibitors 
  • Miscellaneous 
  • Cytoprotective Agents 

Chapter 40: Chemotherapy Side Effects 
  • Myelosuppression 
  • Gastrointestinal 
  • Integumentary 
  • Cardiovascular 
  • Respiratory 
  • Renal 
  • Neurologic 
  • Reproductive 

Chapter 41: Safe Handling 
  • Preparation 
  • Administration 
  • Disposal 
  • Bodily Discharges 

Chapter 42: Administration 
  • Pre-administration Activities 
  • Routes of Administration 

Chapter 43: Psychological Effects 
  • Grief 
  • Loss of Status 
  • Desirability 
  • Long-term Concerns 

Section 6: Gamma Globulin 

This section of the Florida I.V. therapy curriculum has been designed to provide current conceptual and operational knowledge to the licensed nurse interested in the provision of gamma globulin therapy. The understanding and use of gamma globulin has evolved since its entry into mainstream healthcare. For both the RN and LPN involved in providing this therapy, this course contains current practices for best patient outcomes. 

State Boards of Nursing have varying positions on the role of the LPN in the administration of infusion therapy. Gamma globulin is, technically, a blood product and the Florida Board of Nurses prohibits the LPN from initiating infusion of blood products, although the LPN may monitor the infusion. Competency requirements are obtained and maintained through the nurse’s employer, facility or institution. 

Section 6: Gamma Globulin Outline 

Chapter 44: Introduction to Gamma Globulin 
  • Definition 
  • Indications 
  • Products 

Chapter 45: Administration 
  • Intravenous 
  • Subcutaneous 

Chapter 46: Possible Adverse Events 
  • Common Side Effects 
  • Uncommon Side Effects 
  • Anaphylaxis 

Chapter 47: Patient Education 
  • Nurse Administration 
  • Patient Administration 

Chapter 48: Assessment and Documentation 

Resources 
Skills Competency Validation Checklists 
 
 

 

Course Snapshot

Cost: $ 249.00
Contact Hours: 30



Accreditation

After successful completion the licensed nurse: RN, LPN/LVN will receive 30.0 contact hours. Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 15467 and by the Florida Board of Nursing, CE Broker Tracking # 20-360092.
Powered by Kentico CMS