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Know Stroke Know the Signs Act in Time
8/9/2012
Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in adults.
About 600,000 new strokes are reported in the U.S. each year. The good news is that treatments are available that can greatly reduce the damage caused by a stroke. However, you need to recognize the symptoms of a stroke and get to a hospital quickly. Getting treatment within 60 minutes can prevent disability.

What is a stroke?

A stroke, sometimes called a "brain attack," occurs when blood flow to the brain is interrupted. When a stroke occurs, brain cells in the immediate area begin to die because they stop getting the oxygen and nutrients they need to function.
What causes a stroke?

There are two major kinds of stroke.

The first, called an ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel or artery in the brain. About 80 percent of all strokes are ischemic. The second, known as a hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel in the brain that breaks and bleeds into the brain. About 20 percent of strokes are hemorrhagic.

What disabilities can result from a stroke?

Although stroke is a disease of the brain, it can affect the entire body. The effects of a stroke range from mild to severe and can include paralysis, problems with thinking, problems with speaking, and emotional problems. Patients may also experience pain or numbness after a stroke.

To read more of this article from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke:  CLICK HERE.
Pedagogy’s Online Continuing Education Course “Stroke”

It is important that all healthcare providers have education on the early identification of stroke symptoms, emergency care options, and prevention of recurrent stroke.

In 2003, The Joint Commission launched its Primary Stroke Center Certification Program. As of January, 2011, there are more than 800 certified primary stroke centers. The designation signifies that the hospitals meet requirements to provide emergency diagnostic and therapeutic services by a multidisciplinary team 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to patients with symptoms of acute stroke. Eight hours of annual stroke specific continuing education is REQUIRED for the staff who comprise the CORE stroke team. Additionally, at least 80% of the Emergency Department staff is required to have knowledge of the stroke pathophysiology, presentation, assessment, diagnosis and treatment including thrombolytic therapy. Finally, Nurses on non-stroke units, where stroke patients are not routinely cared for, and ancillary staff should receive education related to recognition of stroke signs and symptoms and activation of the organization’s emergency response processes.

Pedagogy's  online course "Stroke" is excellent for all healthcare providers, and will assist hospitals seeking both initial and renewal of primary stroke center certification.

View details or purchase the course: Stroke
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